New Kaplan IT Training Webinar: Career Change and Cybersecurity Certification

June 12, 2018 at 9:00 am | Posted in Kaplan IT Training news | Leave a comment
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The recent boom in cybersecurity jobs is no secret — and neither is the lack of candidates to fill those jobs. According to the 2017 Global Information Security Workforce Study prepared by the Center for Cyber Safety and Education, both the United States and global economies face a critical shortage of skilled cybersecurity employees.  In the U.S. alone, the Department of Labor anticipates cybersecurity jobs will grow up to 28% by 2026, but according to a 2016 report, “there simply is not a sufficient supply of cybersecurity talent to meet the increasing demand.”

So there are plenty of compelling reasons to retrain for a career in IT security. But for many people, it’s hard to figure out exactly which skills you should learn, or which sector to focus on (Internet-of-Things? Phishing and email security? Network intrusion? Big Data analysis?). Can you be self-taught, or do you need a specific kind of training on your resume to get a foot in the door? Which basic IT skills are required to start studying security? Is a certification really helpful, and if so, what are the best ones to start with?

With those questions in mind, our resident Cybersecurity training expert, Robin Abernathy, will talk about the overall job expectations and responsibilities, certification requirements, and specific career options for people who want to break into this critical and well-compensated field.

This FREE webinar will be presented on June 20, 2018, at 11 EST. To register for the webinar, use this link: KITT Webinar Registration

Thanks for joining us!

-the Kaplan IT Training Team

Women In Cybersecurity introduces KITT content expert Robin Abernathy

March 29, 2018 at 3:29 pm | Posted in Careers, Certification Paths, CISSP, CompTIA, cybersecurity, Knowledge | Leave a comment
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Women In Cybersecurity is a quarterly IT blog feature that addresses news and information for women who wish to find out more about careers in cybersecurity.

If you were asked to picture a noted cybersecurity educator and author, you might not imagine a tiny woman with bright red hair and a thick Alabama drawl—that is, until you saw one of her CISSP instructional videos or tried to fit into her standing-room only panel at the recent (ISC)2 conference. And if you were interested in earning one of those security certifications that routinely make top ten lists—certifications like CISA, CISM, and CISSP—you’d find that she wrote not only the practice test, but frequently wrote or co-wrote the textbook as well.

Robin is no stranger to challenge. Her career journey has been a noteworthy progression, as IT in general and cybersecurity in particular are still fields primarily populated with males. Like many IT specialists, she followed a non-traditional career path, starting behind the counter in a strip-mall PC shop in the 80s. She taught herself PC repair, moved from sales to desktop administration, and then took a variety of jobs in network administration and database administration. Robin honed her skills at the primary IT support specialist at the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, where she was responsible for many of the institution’s computer security initiatives, including software updates and documentation, culminating in a coordinated response to the Y2K crisis.

Robin’s strength as a writer and her ability to organize information enabled her to move forward in her career, and eventually led her to a job at a training provider called SelfTest Software. She’s now the shortest and the most senior member (four foot ten and 18 years, respectively) of the content development team at Kaplan IT Training (formerly Transcender and SelfTest Software).  Her twin specialties are project management and cybersecurity, particularly information security and auditing. Her many certifications include CISSP, CASP, Security+, Network+, Project+, A+, PMI’s PMP and CAPM, and ITIL Foundations. Her latest textbook is the CompTIA Project+ Cert Guide: Exam PK0-004 (Certification Guide) published by Pearson IT Certification. Two forthcoming titles are the 2nd Edition CompTIA Advanced Security Practitioner (CASP) CAS-003 Cert Guide (with coauthor Troy McMillan) and the 3rd Edition CISSP Cert Guide (with coauthors Sari Greene and Troy McMillan), also from Pearson IT Certification.

Robin was willing to share her experience with me for this blog post, which we hope will help students who are curious about cybersecurity careers.

Shahara: What is the most fulfilling part of your job?

Robin: I have an affinity for constant change. I thrive on it. And the world of cybersecurity has real-world direct connections. What I like are the real-world stories. There’s always something new. There are new attacks, so I have to stay abreast of the here-and-now versus the used-to-be. The knowledge you need to know is always building and changing. It’s never static.

Shahara: What do you think about certification as an enhancement to the traditional college path?

Robin: I facilitated a recent discussion at a conference where I explained why the certification route is necessary. Attendees asked me the same question, and as I told them, 15 different colleges may have 15 different curricula. I cannot truly measure your job skillset because the requirements and class emphasis will probably be different for each college. Certification standardizes what the industry expects. For instance, CISSP has a blueprint. Employers can see that you have mastered what companies are looking for once you have passed the certification. With a certification, I can assess your knowledge.

Shahara: What would you suggest that colleges and universities do to help their students?

Robin: In the future, colleges and universities might want to consider adding a practicum component to their requirements along with basic certifications.

Shahara: So what are your thoughts on the roles and possibilities for women who want to go into cybersecurity?

Robin: When I was presenting at a recent conference, I noticed that there weren’t many women in attendance, and most of the ones I did see were in support and administrative roles. I presented to about seventy participants, out of which about five were women. Let me tell you: women are needed. I want to see more women in the field. We don’t have enough people in cybersecurity in general, and we’ll only be adding more jobs as more advanced persistent threats. Everyone doesn’t have to be a programmer. There are many other opportunities that require different abilities. I say, investigate and find out where you fit best.

 

If you have questions, she can be reached by email: robin.abernathy@kaplan.com.

See you soon with more great stories about women in cybersecurity!

–Shahara Ruth

 

 

 


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